815 Giggles
Cast Trivia - Titus Welliver
He was born in New Haven, Connecticut, but was raised in Philadelphia and Maine.
His dad, Neil Welliver, was a famous landscape painter, and his mom was a fashion illustrator. He has three brothers, Ethan and John. An additional brother, Silas, was killed overseas.
Like his father, Titus is a talented painter, and considered pursuing it as a career before he fell in love with acting.
He graduated from New York University, with a degree in Performing Arts.
He married actress Joanna Heimbold  in May 1998. They have a son (born May 1999) named Eamonn Lorcan Charles, and a daughter named Quinn (born 2002). They divorced in 2004, and Titus had another daughter in 2006, named Cora, with indie film  producer, Elizabeth Alexander. 
He has a tattoo on his left forearm of an Irish harp, featuring the  names and birth years of his children.  The tatoo on his upper-right arm  is the symbol of his karate dojo.
He enjoys playing the harmonica.
He appeared in the film Twisted and the show Supernatural with Mark Pellegrino. They both other appeared on Prison Break, in episodes right after each other.
He started watching Lost during the first season, but had trouble  watching every week, due to his busy work schedule and family life.
He and Terry O’Quinn never conferred about their interpretations in playing The Man in Black. In fact, Titus says they never spoke about it until the finale viewing party. He loved Terry’s portrayal though.
Since the Man in Black’s name was never revealed, many members of  the Lost cast and crew thought of him as “Titus”, since his name is so  powerful-sounding and unique.
He guest starred in a 1997 episode of Nash Bridges, produced by Carlton Cuse.
Like Neil Hopkins (Liam Pace), he’s well-known for his great Christopher Walken impersonation.
Quotes:
(on joining Lost) “It’s pretty insane. It’s pretty insane. This is a completely different  thing for me. At the street level, it has been crazy. People — from all walks of life — come up and say, “Now, you possessed Locke…?” “Are  you in fact Locke?” “Has the character of Locke been created from you,  and this was a whole setup to crash the plane?”
"I always thought of Smokey as being a real tragic hero, in a way. I  mean, what a place to play from. Here’s a human being who doesn’t want  any of this stuff he’s been handed. All he wants to do is go and find  his people. He wants to go and live a normal life and he can’t. He’s  being held a prisoner, and he just wants to escape. Where’s the evil in  that? We all can understand, if someone has been wrongly convicted and  incarcerated, that the driving force to become free under any  circumstances and what one would do to obtain that freedom. I found that  character really tragic — strong, but deeply tragic…but not evil."
"The thing I found extreme was the time I did the first episode from the  last season — I call it the Nestor Carbonell episode. Everywhere I  went, over a six-month period on a weekly basis, I would say maybe five  to ten times more people were stopping to ask me when I was going back  to Lost and if I had any sense of who my character was and what his name was.”
"I think Damon [Lindeloff] and Carlton [Cuse], and all those involved in Lost wanted to just tell a really good story, and they were able to cram all  those great storytelling elements into a television series in six  seasons, and you’re lucky if you can maintain that level of excellence  in a season or two of something. They managed to pull it off. There are  some naysayers who were Lost fans who said, ‘Well, by the third  season I was feeling lit. Things were kind of flopping around.’ If they  flopped around for the fans, it wasn’t for very long because nobody  left. They all admit that they stayed there. They might have felt  confused or irritated, but they hung in. That’s why I think this show  has real legs — if you can hold an audience for that long without it  being something that’s like a procedural law drama or a cop show or a  hospital show.”
"I feel very blessed for being a part of something that I think will really stand the test of time. I think Lost will continue to find new audiences generation after generation after  generation, and in that way, it’ll be fun to watch when I’m 80 years old  — some ten-year-old coming over and saying, ‘You’re the Man in Black?’ ‘I was.’ “
Videos:
Lost interview
Christopher Walken impersonation
Totally Lost
Buzzine Interview, with Mark Pellegrino

Cast Trivia - Titus Welliver

  • He was born in New Haven, Connecticut, but was raised in Philadelphia and Maine.
  • His dad, Neil Welliver, was a famous landscape painter, and his mom was a fashion illustrator. He has three brothers, Ethan and John. An additional brother, Silas, was killed overseas.
  • Like his father, Titus is a talented painter, and considered pursuing it as a career before he fell in love with acting.
  • He graduated from New York University, with a degree in Performing Arts.
  • He married actress Joanna Heimbold in May 1998. They have a son (born May 1999) named Eamonn Lorcan Charles, and a daughter named Quinn (born 2002). They divorced in 2004, and Titus had another daughter in 2006, named Cora, with indie film producer, Elizabeth Alexander.
  • He has a tattoo on his left forearm of an Irish harp, featuring the names and birth years of his children. The tatoo on his upper-right arm is the symbol of his karate dojo.
  • He enjoys playing the harmonica.
  • He appeared in the film Twisted and the show Supernatural with Mark Pellegrino. They both other appeared on Prison Break, in episodes right after each other.
  • He started watching Lost during the first season, but had trouble watching every week, due to his busy work schedule and family life.
  • He and Terry O’Quinn never conferred about their interpretations in playing The Man in Black. In fact, Titus says they never spoke about it until the finale viewing party. He loved Terry’s portrayal though.
  • Since the Man in Black’s name was never revealed, many members of the Lost cast and crew thought of him as “Titus”, since his name is so powerful-sounding and unique.
  • He guest starred in a 1997 episode of Nash Bridges, produced by Carlton Cuse.
  • Like Neil Hopkins (Liam Pace), he’s well-known for his great Christopher Walken impersonation.

Quotes:

(on joining Lost) “It’s pretty insane. It’s pretty insane. This is a completely different thing for me. At the street level, it has been crazy. People — from all walks of life — come up and say, “Now, you possessed Locke…?” “Are you in fact Locke?” “Has the character of Locke been created from you, and this was a whole setup to crash the plane?”

"I always thought of Smokey as being a real tragic hero, in a way. I mean, what a place to play from. Here’s a human being who doesn’t want any of this stuff he’s been handed. All he wants to do is go and find his people. He wants to go and live a normal life and he can’t. He’s being held a prisoner, and he just wants to escape. Where’s the evil in that? We all can understand, if someone has been wrongly convicted and incarcerated, that the driving force to become free under any circumstances and what one would do to obtain that freedom. I found that character really tragic — strong, but deeply tragic…but not evil."

"The thing I found extreme was the time I did the first episode from the last season — I call it the Nestor Carbonell episode. Everywhere I went, over a six-month period on a weekly basis, I would say maybe five to ten times more people were stopping to ask me when I was going back to Lost and if I had any sense of who my character was and what his name was.”

"I think Damon [Lindeloff] and Carlton [Cuse], and all those involved in Lost wanted to just tell a really good story, and they were able to cram all those great storytelling elements into a television series in six seasons, and you’re lucky if you can maintain that level of excellence in a season or two of something. They managed to pull it off. There are some naysayers who were Lost fans who said, ‘Well, by the third season I was feeling lit. Things were kind of flopping around.’ If they flopped around for the fans, it wasn’t for very long because nobody left. They all admit that they stayed there. They might have felt confused or irritated, but they hung in. That’s why I think this show has real legs — if you can hold an audience for that long without it being something that’s like a procedural law drama or a cop show or a hospital show.”

"I feel very blessed for being a part of something that I think will really stand the test of time. I think Lost will continue to find new audiences generation after generation after generation, and in that way, it’ll be fun to watch when I’m 80 years old — some ten-year-old coming over and saying, ‘You’re the Man in Black?’ ‘I was.’ “

Videos:


  1. apetunicorn reblogged this from 815giggles
  2. tollana reblogged this from innocentskeleton
  3. beesayay reblogged this from 815giggles
  4. innocentskeleton reblogged this from 815giggles
  5. bright-young-thing reblogged this from 815giggles and added:
    Will never not reblog Titus Welliver
  6. heroinista reblogged this from 815giggles
  7. quintessenceofdust reblogged this from 815giggles
  8. 815giggles posted this